Thursday, May 18, 2006

Sign of the times

The old style road signs in France. This was taken in the town of L'isle-sur-Tarn. I think I will be going back it is such a lovely place and lots of hidden corners to explore.

These signs are of the previous generation, made of a base of concrete. But where would you want to go? Somewhere like Toulouse or one of those unpronounceable names (that is if you don’t speak French.)

Or would you like to open the gate to the secrete garden?

8 comments:

Mark said...

Just past lavour please Wilf, there is a cute little golf with several lakes. Its called the golf de L'Etangs de fiac.

Wilf James said...

Next time I head off down that way I'll take a few shots - hopefully get something good to post!

Marie McC said...

Nice photo! I love old road signs. And I love this weathered fence. Funny what odd things appeal to us!

Jenny said...

I love this photo - I'd love to go to the right - can't imagine what briatexte graulhet and/or lavaur might be!

soosha_q said...

Oh wilf, this is such a wonderful post. Not just the picture, but your comments to go with it. The whole things is like the prelude to a most wonderful and intriguing story!

Personally I'd explore what's behind the gate first, then head off to the unpronouncable place because I've heard of Toulouse before so I'd make that my last stop. I've got a wonderful scene of romantic adventure playing out in my head now. Thank you so much!

Louz said...

Your photo just makes me want to walk through that gate and see what behind all that greenery. Nice photo (and photos in general on your blog)!

Eric said...

I love these signs too and I realize, thanks to your comment, how many useless letters we use in French! Even being French I would not know how to pronounce rasbastens (is the s silent?!)

Wilf James said...

Well no the ‘S’ is pronounced but I still am confused if the last part is pronounced “tens” or “tances” if that is clear to you?? I think it depends on the accent and where you come from – either north or south of France.

But I think the locals go with the first one – RabasTENS – as in the english number ten(s), if that makes sense to you?

Thank goodness I am trying to explain this to a Frenchman.